Special Court Rebuffs John Jay Hooker’s Latest Swing At Tennessee Judicial Selection

Attorney John Jay Hooker speaks at the Tennessee Legislature. The 83-year-old says he has made it his life's mission to prove the current system for selecting judges is unconstitutional. Credit: Sean Braisted via Flickr

Attorney John Jay Hooker speaks at the Tennessee Legislature. The 83-year-old says he has made it his life’s mission to prove the current system for selecting judges is unconstitutional. Credit: Sean Braisted via Flickr

A specially-appointed Tennessee Supreme Court has denied a challenge to the state’s selection process for judges. It’s yet another failed lawsuit filed by activist attorney John Jay Hooker.

In this instance, the sitting court recused itself since it has an inherent conflict of interest in how judges are chosen. Five attorneys were appointed as a “special Supreme Court.” But they didn’t buy Hooker’s argument that the state constitution mandates direct elections. Appellate judges are currently appointed by the governor and only sit for retention elections.

The 83-year-old says the ballgame isn’t over.

“I’m not singing the blues. I’m still alive, still on base and going to have another day.”

The special panel did leave an opening for Hooker to try again, and he says he will.

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