The Amp Isn’t Dead, But It Will Have To Come Back To The Legislature

House Speaker Beth Harwell, who’s no fan of the current design for the Amp near her West End district, is skeptical of its chances of getting state funding on top of Metro and federal dollars. (Photo: Daniel Potter/WPLN)

House Speaker Beth Harwell, who’s no fan of the current design for the Amp near her West End district, is skeptical of its chances of getting state funding on top of Metro and federal dollars. (Photo: Daniel Potter/WPLN)

State lawmakers are effectively reserving the right to veto Nashville’s proposed bus rapid transit proposal, known as the Amp.  The bill now on its way to the governor ensures one way or another, the legislature will revisit the issue.

The version that ultimately passed is not as harsh as one earlier draft to torpedo the Amp’s design altogether.  Instead, it says both the state House and Senate must sign off before it’s built.  That could simply mean approving some state funding for it, but House Speaker Beth Harwell says it won’t be an easy sell for Nashville Mayor Karl Dean.

“I don’t think it has the support from the public necessary to be successful.  I think Mayor Dean has an opportunity to perhaps look at an alternative… whether it’s an alternative route or an alternative plan for that section of highway.”

Dean has already made some concessions to opponents, like paring back part of the plan that would’ve significantly overhauled a stretch of West End Avenue near Harwell’s district.

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