Lawmakers Settle On Meth Bill At Twice The Governor’s Proposed Limits

Gov. Bill Haslam (center) preferred lower limits on pseudoephedrine sales, but said "we're grateful that a bill got passed, and now we'll put that into practice and we hope it makes a real difference." (Photo: Daniel Potter/WPLN)

Gov. Bill Haslam (center) preferred lower limits on pseudoephedrine sales, but said “we’re grateful that a bill got passed, and now we’ll put that into practice and we hope it makes a real difference.” (Photo: Daniel Potter/WPLN)

Tennesseans will face a new limit on how much cold and allergy medicine they can buy containing pseudoephedrine, which is used to cook meth.  While it’s not as tough as Governor Bill Haslam wanted, the law will restrict people to a four month supply each year.

It’s twice the amount of pseudoephedrine Haslam wanted to allow.  Sumner County Republican William Lamberth said it’s the best lawmakers could realistically pass, which is better than nothing: “In fact, days before I told friends of mine in law enforcement you know I’m sorry, it’s just not going to happen this year.  I am really encouraged by this version.”

The bill also blocks high schoolers from buying pseudoephedrine, because officials worried they’d be recruited for a quick buck to help meth cooks skirt the new limits.

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