Both Sides Say They’re Happy, But Amp Foes Gain Upper Hand

StopAMP was on hand at a meeting in January, where maps of the route were laid out for public comment. Image: Claire Tattersfield

StopAMP was on hand at a meeting in January, where maps of the route were laid out for public comment. Image: Claire Tattersfield

Both supporters and detractors of the Amp seemed somewhat satisfied by the final legislation that passed the General Assembly in its final day. But the bottom line is the Stop Amp activists have gained ground.

Banning the project outright didn’t happen. So supporters dodged a bullet.

But Amp foes say they’re confident the compromise legislation will eventually undo the high-speed bus.

“The result was not our dream result,” said Rick Williams with the Stop Amp group. “It suffices for now. Let’s just see where we are a year from now. Obviously, if the mayor continues to push for the Amp in the center of the road on West End Avenue, then we’ll be back here with more legislation.”

City transit planners say they talk nearly every day with federal officials, who are helping them work through the state resistance.

In addition, supporters say the project has a fair amount of latitude, even at this point, so there could be a way to work around the barriers state lawmakers are erecting.

Mustering the support of both chambers, however, if that’s what it comes down to, will be a tough barrier to clear.

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