Fate Of Nashville’s Amp May Hinge On Small Panel Of State Lawmakers

Supporters of the Amp BRT line held signs behind Mayor Karl Dean at the Metro Courthouse as he thanked President Obama for federal funding. Credit: Dean Administration

Supporters of the Amp BRT line held signs behind Mayor Karl Dean at the Metro Courthouse as he thanked President Obama for federal funding. Credit: Dean Administration

Whether Nashville’s proposed Amp will be derailed by state lawmakers may soon be decided by a small panel of committee members. And there’s also a chance that the project will be left nearly untouched.

There are now two versions of a bill aimed at the proposed bus service, with its dedicated lane.

The Senate would throw the current design into question, by keeping passengers from boarding the bus in the middle of the road.

The House version is an almost symbolic approach, calling for the legislature to have a say in whether or not to approve the project – authority, which, under current law, it already has.

With the two chambers split, the bill will likely end up in the hands of a conference committee – with three members from the Senate and three from the House.

Rep. Jeremy Durham, the bill’s sponsor, says the committee might even come up with a proposal that isn’t in either of the bills. He wouldn’t elaborate.

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