Bill To Allow Guns In Parks Statewide May Be Down, But Not Out

The legislature passed a guns-in-parks law a few years ago that allowed cities and counties to opt out, and many have. The new proposal would effectively delete such exemptions. (Photo via Seth Anderson/flickr)

The legislature passed a guns-in-parks law a few years ago that allowed cities and counties to opt out, and many have. The new proposal would effectively delete such exemptions. (Photo via Seth Anderson/flickr)

State lawmakers will wait until the end of session to take on a proposal that would let people carry guns in any park across the state, without exceptions.

The bill has already passed the Senate, but was postponed Wednesday in the House.

Supposedly, it will cost some money for signage, but that isn’t paid for in the planned budget from the governor—who argues cities should keep the ability to ban guns in parks.  So the House Finance Committee essentially voted to put the bill off until after the budget is passed, and then see whether there’s loose change left to pay for it.  There rarely is.

Asked whether the move amounts to a kiss of death for the bill, House Majority Leader Gerald McCormick said often it would be, but in this case, not necessarily.  That’s because the estimated cost is just $40 thousand—a piddly amount, in state-lawmaker dollars.  So, McCormick says, don’t count guns-in-parks out just yet.

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