For Bills Targeting Common Core, Legislative Delay May Not Bode Well

Mark White chairs the House Education Subcommittee, and says several bills pushing back on Common Core and the PARCC test were pushed to the end of the agenda when their respective sponsors didn't show up Tuesday. (Photo via Mark White's Twitter page)

Mark White chairs the House Education Subcommittee, and says several bills pushing back on Common Core and the PARCC test were pushed to the end of the agenda when their respective sponsors didn’t show up Tuesday. (Photo via Mark White’s Twitter page)

The prospects seemed to dim somewhat Tuesday for several proposals meant to slow Tennessee’s path toward Common Core school standards and PARCC, the new standardized test that comes with them.

Many of the bills were not killed outright, but postponed—kicked to the bottom of a long committee agenda, where they may not got another hearing until late in the legislative session.

One that was actually brought up effectively died because it would cost Tennessee millions of dollars to stop in its tracks and stick with the current statewide test.

Committee Chairman Mark White says many similar bills had the same problem—too high an estimated cost, called a fiscal note:

“A lot of these bills have the same fiscal note.  With the day’s budget, (to) move this out, you’re going to have to get your fiscal note in order first.”

White says it could be a month before the proposals come up again.  And by that point, they won’t have much time to work out amendments they might need to win over skeptical lawmakers.

Please keep your community civil. Comments will be moderated prior to posting, and Nashville Public Radio reserves the right to approve them at its discretion. Comments containing links promoting goods, services - even noble organizations - will not be published. Your comments may include external links, but all comments with links will be delayed as they are reviewed. Comments containing profanity will be rejected.