Dickson Arts And Education Facility Donated Outright To West Tennessee College

The Jackson family built Dickson's hospital in the late 1950s, then sold it to HCA in 1995. Money from that sale went towards building the Renaissance Center. Image via Renaissance Center.

The Jackson family built Dickson’s hospital in the late 1950s, then sold it to HCA in 1995. Money from that sale went towards building the Renaissance Center. Image via Renaissance Center.

The Renaissance Center in Dickson is changing hands and becoming a place to earn a four-year college degree.

The community education center was created by the Jackson Foundation, a non-profit lead by former state legislator Doug Jackson. That foundation is handing over 200 acres of land, the building and its operations to Freed-Hardeman University, a Church of Christ school in Henderson, Tenn.

Roughly 300 people are currently taking off-site courses from Nashville State and Austin Peay State University at the Renaissance Center, and those classes will continue through the spring semester. But starting in the fall, all college offerings will be from Freed-Hardeman. The school hasn’t yet decided which courses of study to offer in Dickson, only that students will be able to complete a full degree program there.

The facility will continue to offer a slate of events like art and computer classes, theater productions and planetarium shows.

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