Metro’s Trick For Adopting Out Grown Cats During Kitten Season: Lower Fees

In an effort to lower Nashville's euthanasia rate, this year Metro began expanding its work with animal rescue groups, tinkering with lower adoption fees, and trying to attract more people using social media and cute photos. (Credit Penny Adams / MACC)

In an effort to lower Nashville’s euthanasia rate, this year Metro began expanding its work with animal rescue groups, tinkering with lower adoption fees, and trying to attract more people using social media and cute photos. (Credit Penny Adams / MACC)

Metro officials say they found homes for ten times more adult cats in the last few months than the same time a year ago.  As part of its effort to lower Nashville’s kill rate, Animal Control offered a bargain price for adult cats.

Summer is a season of cute kittens, and Animal Control says it can be a tough time for grown cats in need of homes too, like Holstein, a three-year-old tuxedo cat with yellow eyes.

Where Metro normally charges $60 to adopt a grown cat, for the last few months they cut the fee to $5.

Animal Control’s Becca Morris says it’s gotten results: Around this time last year, six cats were adopted.  This year: sixty.  Still, despite efforts to place more dogs and cats via social media, and working with outside rescue groups, Metro has work to do.  While the number euthanized is down a bit, the number brought in is up almost 10 percent.

Stats here in PDF form – Note ‘cats’ refers to both cats and kittens.

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