Teenagers And Concussions: Vandy Finds Age Doesn’t Change Symptoms

While symptoms like headache and dizziness generally subsided whether the athlete was 15 or 20, researchers say effects of concussion may still show up in other areas, like schoolwork. (Credit Chris Sgaraglino / flickr)

While symptoms like headache and dizziness generally subsided whether the athlete was 15 or 20, researchers say effects of concussion may still show up in other areas, like schoolwork.
(Credit Chris Sgaraglino / flickr)

Despite worries that concussions from sports are especially bad for high-schoolers compared to athletes in college, a new Vanderbilt study says the symptoms are about the same.

Concerns over head injuries have been on the rise in recent years, as experts learn more about lasting damage from physical games like football.

The study compared almost a hundred athletes in their mid-teens with an evenly matched group around age 20, all of whom filled out questionnaires both before and after concussions.  It’s the kind of injury at the center of a national discussion on sports and safety, like in this PBS Frontline documentary out this week.

Vanderbilt found almost 96 percent of high-schoolers were back to normal after a month, versus almost 97 percent of college athletes.

However, a researcher cautioned the study only looked at symptoms, like headache, nausea, dizziness, and trouble concentrating or remembering things.  He says effects on the brain might be seen in other areas, like how students do in school.

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