At Fort Campbell, The Government Shutdown Is Basically Over

Fort Campbell is home to the 101st Airborne Division, which has been one of the most heavily-deployed units in the last 12 years of war. Credit: Stephen Jerkins

Fort Campbell is home to the 101st Airborne Division, which has been one of the most heavily-deployed units in the last 12 years of war. Credit: Stephen Jerkins

Clerks are restocking the shelves of the Fort Campbell commissary, the post hospital is again fully staffed and the civilian workforce of 8,000 is back to full strength. The Pentagon decided over the weekend furlough rules didn’t have to keep so many people off the job.

A town hall meeting scheduled for Monday night was cancelled after most employees were recalled. The furloughs turned out to be more bark than bite for civilians, who should end up being paid for their days off.

Among military families, there have been very real fears from the reduced services. Tina Armstrong – whose husband is an Army refueling specialist – says she was worried she wouldn’t be able to get a short-term loan offered through the military.

“Right now, we have our car in the shop,” she said Monday. “With everything shut down, if I need help, I’m in trouble.”

There are still some reduced services on Fort Campbell. For instance, under Pentagon rules, the post’s spokesman says he isn’t supposed to do recorded interviews. Also soldiers who have orders to move between posts are being told to stay put for the time being.

But for the most part, operations should return to business as usual this week.

Please keep your community civil. Comments will be moderated prior to posting, and Nashville Public Radio reserves the right to approve them at its discretion. Comments containing links promoting goods, services - even noble organizations - will not be published. Your comments may include external links, but all comments with links will be delayed as they are reviewed. Comments containing profanity will be rejected.