TN Gov: Before VW Recognizes Union, There Should Be A Secret Ballot

Gov. Bill Haslam has been in talks with VW officials, trying to convince them to not cooperate with the VW. He says, however, he did not try to encourage them by offering additional government incentives. Credit: TN Photo Services

Gov. Bill Haslam has been in talks with VW officials, trying to convince them to not cooperate with the VW. He says, however, he did not try to encourage them by offering additional government incentives. Credit: TN Photo Services

Tennessee’s top Republicans continue to try to fend off the United Auto Workers from unionizing the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga. Governor Bill Haslam says the 2,500 employees deserve to take a secret vote on it.

The UAW says a majority of workers have signed union cards that should be recognized as a binding vote. Haslam – who has been trying to keep the union out of Tennessee plants – disagrees.

“[Is] a majority of having cards checked the same thing as a secret ballot?” Haslam asked reporters. “We believe strongly in the rights of having people to be able to vote privately on anything.”

However, it’s up to Volkswagen whether to recognize the cards and begin negotiating a labor contract with the union. And a spokesperson from the Chattanooga plant tells Reuters the company is in no hurry.

UAW organizers want to avoid a secret ballot.

“Only companies that want to fight unions make you go through a traditional NLRB election,” UAW Region 8 director Gary Casteel says.

So far, VW hasn’t been fighting.

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