On Syria, Everyone Has An Opinion

UPDATED: SEPT. 5TH, 4:45PM
Tennessee’s Delegation Begins to Telegraph Syria Votes

Members of Tennessee’s congressional delegation say they have received a lot of calls, tweets and emails from their constituents on the subject of military intervention in Syria. The lawmakers have begun indicating how they may vote on the matter.

Rep. Diane Black of Gallatin says she doesn’t trust the President’s justification at the moment. Congressman Marsha Blackburn says she’s “leaning no.” And Scott DesJarlais – who represents Murfreesboro – says he remains opposed. Middle Tennessee’s only Democrat in Washington – Jim Cooper – has said he’s undecided but “leery” of military action.

Poll Suggests Uncertainty Among Americans

A Pew Research poll released this week finds 23 percent of Americans don’t know whether they favor or oppose bombing Syria. And they are evenly split between people who identify as Republicans and Democrats.

Middle Tennesseeans Speak Their Minds

Steve Simms: “I don’t understand how killing people to punish someone for killing people makes any sense.” Image: WPLN/Daniel Potter

Steve Simms: “I don’t understand how killing people to punish someone for killing people makes any sense.” Image: WPLN/Daniel Potter

WPLN has been asking Middle Tennesseans to weigh in on US intervention in Syria this week. Here are some of their responses:

“It’s not our problem. Granted, it is a problem and maybe something should be done. I just don’t feel like it’s our place to step in. I don’t feel like we should parent the world.”
-Lori Fulghum, Eagleville

“I don’t know what to do, but I want to help those people. I see those people crying. They are innocent people. They are innocent kids.”
-Fatima Hemant, Nashville

“You’ve got to find a balance, I think. Too much war is not going to be good and lack of action is also not acceptable. So it’s not an easy answer. I don’t want to get into a drawn out conflict again.”
-Matthew Garner, Nashville

Babsoz Kokoy: “We need to help Syria.  We have to… to help the innocent people.  They didn’t do anything to just bomb them with a chemical bomb—why?  Because it happened to us—I’m Kurdish—so it happened to us.  I don’t want it to be happening to other people.” Image: WPLN/Daniel Potter

Babsoz Kokoy: “We need to help Syria.  We have to… to help the innocent people.  They didn’t do anything to just bomb them with a chemical bomb—why?  Because it happened to us—I’m Kurdish—so it happened to us.  I don’t want it to be happening to other people.” Image: WPLN/Daniel Potter

ORIGINAL POST: SEPT. 4:42 PM
When the following quotes were gathered, the Senate had begun debating intervention in Syria, but had not yet voted:

“I worry what happens if there are strikes against Syria, and I worry what happens if there aren’t strikes against Syria.”
– Abbie Wolf of the Jewish Federation of Nashville.

“I think it should be avoided if at all possible, if at all possible.”
- Manuel Sir, retired dentist.

“They say if you don’t deal with the problem then you’re part of the problem. I don’t think we can ignore the situation. We can’t put sanctions on them because they’ll laugh at us.”
- Marcia Rosen, retired teacher.

“I find it very disturbing, actually, the fact that we’re kind of involving ourselves in issues that don’t really involve us.”
- Lamont Oden, system administrator.

“We’re kind of damned if we do and damned if we don’t.”
- Max Sadler, who works in information technology.

 

Here are some of the reactions we received on our Facebook timeline:

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