Mayor Calls Nashville Symphony And Schermerhorn Center Too Culturally Important To Fail

The base of this statue, which stands near the stage door of Schermerhorn Symphony Center, bears an inscription thanking the city and its citizens for making the building possible. Credit: Nina Cardona/WPLN

The base of this statue, which stands near the stage door of Schermerhorn Symphony Center, bears an inscription thanking the city and its citizens for making the building possible. Credit: Nina Cardona/WPLN

Nashville’s mayor is urging the symphony and its creditors to work out a deal rather than let Schermerhorn Symphony Center go into foreclosure.

Dean says it wouldn’t be appropriate to get into the middle of things himself, but says there are plenty of mediators in the city who could help.

“Clearly there’s got to be give and take but it’s important for the city of Nashville that we have this symphony and that that building, that is a beautiful building, that it continues to be its symphony hall.”

Bank of America has scheduled a foreclosure auction for June 28th, essentially creating a hard deadline for the ongoing talks about how to restructure the orchestra’s debt.

A statement from the union representing symphony musicians has harsh words for both that move by the bank and the experts hired to help the orchestra, calling the debt negotiations a “tug of war between attorneys, bankers and bean counters.”


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