State Plans to Unload ‘Functionally Obsolete’ Office Buildings

The Cordell Hull Building was constructed in 1952 and houses several state agencies. Image courtesy Flickr/unertlkm

The Cordell Hull Building was constructed in 1952 and houses several state agencies. Image courtesy Flickr/unertlkm

The state of Tennessee is making plans to sell off large office complexes, including the Cordell Hull Building in the shadow of the state capitol. The agency overseeing state buildings says they’re beyond repair.

In tight years, General Services Commissioner Steve Cates says maintenance is one of the first things to go. And that’s happened for enough years, he says half a dozen buildings aren’t worth saving.

“It’s probably the first time we’ve looked at what the true deferred maintenance costs are compared to the value.”

Cates says the buildings can’t be sold for much, but it’s still a better deal than shoveling money into costly repairs.

The largest to be put on the market is Cordell Hull, which was built in the 1950s. It houses offices of the Attorney General and departments of Health and Children’s Services. Nearby, Cates also wants to offload the Tennessee Regulatory Authority building. The others are in Chattanooga and Memphis.

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