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Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

In Clarksville, Police Say They Welcome Body Cameras

Cell phone footage shot by bystanders showing sometimes violent police interactions with civilians has led to more discussions nationwide about whether officers should wear body cameras. In some cities, local law enforcement has resisted that idea. But that’s not the case in Clarksville, where the police department has actually been one of its biggest supporters.

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Courtesy of David Wild

The CMA Awards on Wednesday night is expected to be both a celebration of country music and an entire industry’s take on recent natural disasters and shooting tragedies. The man tasked with performing that balancing act is David Wild, the writer whose words presenters will read off of scrolling teleprompters.

Courtesy of Tennessee Board of Regents

The governor is hearing funding requests from every department in the state this week, and the routine is a familiar one — hit him with the highlights and then ask for money. 

Nashville soccer stadium
Nashville Mayor's Office

The deal to build a professional soccer stadium in Nashville got a significant vote of confidence on Monday from a portion of the Metro Council. A final vote on Tuesday night will determine if the city and the team would share in the stadium cost — if the city is awarded a franchise.

TN Photo Services

Governor Bill Haslam is again asking state agencies to trim their budgets, but this year he warns they might actually have to follow through.

Courtesy Russell Moore via Facebook

The head the Southern Baptist Convention's political arm says there's no gun control policy outlined in the Bible. And so the powerful Nashville-based denomination isn't taking a position, even after more than 20 members of a Texas congregation were murdered in their own sanctuary on Sunday.

courtesy Pexels

Tennesseans may end up paying less for insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace this year — that's as average rates went up by as much as 42 percent. Even the people who assist in signups for coverage were surprised by the final costs they're seeing.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

 


Rather than just asking kids what they want to be when they grow up, Nashville’s public schools are experimenting with a new test developed by a local company to help students figure out what they’re naturally good at. Metro Schools have already made a big push to get students thinking about careers early on — this is the next step in also helping them find the right fit.

CMA World

The Country Music Association lifted its ban on questions about the Las Vegas tragedy around noon on Friday after growing social media outcry from musicians and journalists.

"CMA apologizes for the recently distributed restrictions in the CMA Awards media guidelines, which have since been lifted. The sentiment was not to infringe and was created with the best of intentions to honor and celebrate Country Music."

Caleb Shiver / WPLN

More and more musicians are going old-school when they record — using reel-to-reel tape machines. But manufacturers aren't producing these massive devices anymore, and the used machines that are still functioning are hard to come by.

Police Chief Steve Anderson speaks at Police Academy (archive)
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

 


Legislation proposing a community oversight board to investigate police misconduct will make its way to Metro Council for the first time on Tuesday.

 

The movement gained steam after a damning study on the disproportionate treatment of African American drivers in Nashville and the subsequent death of Jocques Clemmons, an African American man shot to death by a Metro officer after he ran during a traffic stop in February. The officer was not charged.

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Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Former Tennessee Tech professor Wonkak Kim is back in Middle Tennessee for a visit, so of course we made sure to have him swing through our studios for a performance. Kim, a clarinetist, brought with him the Parker String Quartet. The ensemble is currently on tour and is serving a residency at Harvard.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Mozart wrote his opera, The Marriage of Figaro, in the late 18th century, long before reality television. However, a new production featuring Blair School of Music students highlights the similarities between the over-the-top antics and scheming of the classical-era plot and modern-day shows like Big Brother and The Bachelor. Ahead of their very contemporary production, singers from the Vanderbilt Opera Theater came to sing highlights from the show.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Baritone Jeffrey Williams is a cheerful, friendly guy, but he loves singing roles that explore the darker side of life. The Austin Peay State University professor obtained a Center for Excellence grant for composer Leanna Kirchoff to write a mono-opera based on Guy de Maupassant's "Diary of a Madman," which premiered on a Halloween night recital of spooky and creepy classical music at Austin Peay. Williams is joined by Ben Harris on piano and Kevin Jablonsk playing double-bass, with the composer on hand to tell us about her approach to the piece.

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