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MDHA Says Its Next Project Could Be A Partnership With Fisk University

Nashville's housing authority is in preliminary talks with Fisk University to co-develop its campus along with a nearby public housing complex, an official said Monday at a Metro Council budget hearing.

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During this year's session, the Tennessee legislature passed a bill that seeks to punish "sanctuary cities," but Gov. Bill Haslam has yet to sign it. And some hope this could be the rare time he chooses to veto.

 

He’s facing pressure from those who are opposed to the measure and — from within his own party — by those who have seen anti-immigration issues be effectively used in political campaigns.

In this edition of The Tri-Star State, Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins and Chas Sisk sort through why Haslam might just issue a veto.

Nashville transit nMotion
nMotion.info

One of Nashville’s steps toward a new mass transit plan will be to revisit the strategy adopted two years ago, when city and regional officials endorsed what’s known as “nMotion.”

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Dealing with the $17 million budget shortfall facing Metro Schools is one of the many challenges for Nashville's next mayor. Already, school officials are scrambling to find the money so no teachers get laid off and funding for students doesn't get cut.

Courtesy National Bail Out

Some activists say Nashville’s new pre-trial release program, which aims to increase the number of low-income defendants released without having to pay bail, is not doing enough to keep poor people from waiting behind bars. They’re responding by organizing a “bail out” this weekend, part of a national campaign to get black moms home for Mother’s Day. 

courtesy CIDRZ

Nashville's Meharry Medical College is working out the details of its first international partnership, and the historically black institution plans to focus on health challenges the U.S. shares with the southern African nation of Zambia. 

Elliott Wenzler / WPLN

Tom Dennis can guess the weight of a catfish just by looking at it.

"That thing's got to be in the mid-20s," Dennis said last week at Little's Fish Market in Germantown. "See? I'm getting good at this."

He wasn't ordering his dinner. His catfish was headed for the ice at Bridgestone Arena. 

MTA bus Music City Central
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Following closely after the defeat of the multi-billion dollar transit referendum, renovation work will begin on Nashville’s main downtown bus terminal, Music City Central. The $6 million project was already planned, and some consider it overdue.

TN Photo Services

Narrowing the education gap will be one challenge facing whoever becomes Tennessee's next governor.

Students in the state are doing better in math and reading, but black and Hispanic students aren't improving as fast as their white counterparts.

Amy Eskind / WPLN

American restaurants tend to serve only the kinds of seafood diners are most familiar with. But that is proving to be environmentally unsustainable, and the industry is responding. Restauranteurs are embracing a movement to serve sustainable seafood — steering clear of fish that are caught in a damaging way, taking depleted species off the menu and offering diners relatively unfamiliar species that aren't overfished.

 


Metro Schools Superintendent Shawn Joseph said at a board meeting Tuesday that he won't balance the district's budget shortfall by cutting teachers or funds for students. That's despite the fact that Metro Schools needs to slash $17 million from next year's budget.

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The Moth StorySLAM in Nashville

Join us at The Basement East on May 20 for The Moth's open mic StorySLAM!

The Promise: Life, Death and Change in the Projects

This WPLN special series podcast explores life in public housing, in the middle of a city on the rise.

The Latest from Classical 91.1

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

As one of Nashville's premiere vocal groups, Portara Ensemble's repertoire spans a wide range of genres and styles. Director Jason Shelton brought the ensemble and one of their diverse programs to the studio in advance of their June 3rd concert, called "Home." The performance will be a benefit for Open Table Nashville, a non-profit organization working to end homelessness. And while the program might cover a range of styles — including a stunning performance of a traditional spiritual and the world premiere of a new work with words provided by members of the ensemble — the pieces are all thematically tied together by the idea of home.  

Courtesy of Colleen Phelps

"You won't hear anything: you'll hear everything," is how avant-garde musician John Cage described his events known as Musicircus. First performed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Musicircus began as an invitation for artists to come together in a space and perform whatever they chose, simultaneously.

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

Studio C was brimming with energy when two dozen 5th and 6th graders arrived from Scales Elementary School in Murfreesboro. Together, they form Steel de Boro, an after school student steel drum band lead by percussionist and Scales music teacher Tony Hartman. The group played several originals by Hartman and wrapped up their set with a Herbie Hancock classic. 

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