courtesy MTA

Nashville Mayor Calls For Big Spending To Get Started On Light Rail, Forecasts 'Headaches' To Come

Nashville is ready to pursue light rail train service. That was the big reveal in the “State of Metro” speech by Mayor Megan Barry. “I am very happy to announce that today the work begins to create light rail service on the Gallatin Pike corridor,” she said to applause near the end of her address outside Bridgestone Arena.

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Craig Fitzhugh
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

The Tennessee legislature is in horse trading mode as it nears final votes on Governor Bill Haslam's signature infrastructure funding bill, which includes a gas tax increase along with cuts to taxes on groceries and manufacturing. Passage will almost certainly require the help of Democrats. And minority party leaders have decided to offer their votes in exchange for support of an educational endowment.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

We live in a society where what we do often defines how we see ourselves: Our identity is tied up with careers and success. So what happens when we're forced to leave an old identity behind and start over? 

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

There’s a frustrating phenomenon that happens to some people who are very successful. Take Kelly Holly-Bockelmann, an astrophysicist at Vanderbilt: Even after getting multiple degrees and receiving high-profile grants, she says she still often feels like she’s not good enough. And that feeling can intensify the more successful she gets. She talked to WPLN’s Emily Siner during the live taping of our Movers & Thinkers podcast about the dreaded "imposter syndrome." 

Hannah has a rare genetic disorder that causes her to stop breathing when she goes to sleep. She wears a ventilator at night. How does having to constantly monitor a basic human function change how Hannah and her family approach life? 

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Plumbing, electrical and HVAC repair companies are beginning to see the military as a prime talent pool. Handyman services have had a tough time recruiting in recent years, especially as the job market improves. Perhaps none have turned their attention to former service members like Nashville's Hiller Plumbing, which has made Fort Campbell into almost a sole source of manpower.

Alberto G. via Flickr

State education officials are dubbing the first day of standardized testing in Tennessee schools "nearly flawless."

Without a doubt, day one went more smoothly than last year. In 2016, computer glitches were followed by printing problems for the paper backups. TNReady's launch got off to such a rough start that testing was basically scrapped for the year.

Office of Governer Bill Haslam

Healthcare activists say they will continue protesting at the Capitol until the state expands Medicaid. A group called Moral Movement Tennessee talked to reporters Monday, about a week after 11 people were arrested during a sit-in at Gov. Bill Haslam’s office.

 

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Hundreds of bills are filed when the Tennessee legislature revs up at the first of the year. And dozens of them attract attention — sometimes from around the country. But this year, most of those headline-grabbing proposals quietly fizzled out. WPLN’s statehouse reporter Chas Sisk joins Blake Farmer to walk through what happened to some of them.

Tilman Goins
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

A proposal meant to give lawmakers more opportunities to override vetoes of controversial legislation could be tripped up by a separate measure that would dramatically increase how much money state senators can raise.

The dispute between the Tennessee House of Representatives and the state Senate could come to a showdown as lawmakers wrap up this year's legislative session.

AMSF2011 via Flickr

Last month, Sen. Lamar Alexander proposed a bill intended to help people who live where health insurance companies are pulling out of the Affordable Care Act marketplace. It would apply nationwide but indirectly references one specific organization in the senator's home state: Tennessee Farm Bureau.

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A mandolinist, a cellist and a double bassist walk into a barn. No, this isn’t the beginning of some terribly bad joke, but it is how Chris Thile, Edgar Meyer and Yo-Yo Ma came together to record music of J.S. Bach. Their new album Bach Trios was released earlier this month. 

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

The Music City Horn Quartet is a somewhat new ensemble of Nashville freelance French horn players (including one horn maker!), all of  whom also have ties to Clarksville's Gateway Chamber Orchestra: Jennifer Kummer, Tara Johnson, John Gough and Joey Demko. They've brought a collection of music originally written for other instruments or ensembles, arranged for four horns.

unknown passport photographer / King's College Library, Cambridge

This weekend, a group of Nashville ensembles will present the U.S. premiere of a work they think of not as a performance, but an invitation to activism.

British composer James McCarthy’s oratorio, Codebreaker, illuminates key moments from the life of Alan Turing. The groundbreaking computer scientist broke Germany’s Enigma Code during World War II and established the quintessential test of artificial intelligence. 

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Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump's Tweets, Annotated

President Trump tweets a lot. With tens of millions of followers on Twitter, Trump proposes policy, shares his latest actions and reacts to the news. But 140 characters rarely gives the full context. Here, NPR fact checkers attempt to do just that for key tweets.

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Indivisible

Indivisible: A Special Call-In Show During President Trump's First 100 Days

Listen and be part of the conversation: Monday - Thursday at 7 p.m. on 90.3 WPLN-FM