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Joe Nolan

20 Photos Of The Wonderful And The Weird On Nashville's Lebanon Pike

The Pikes Project began in 2015 with the publishing of a photo essay of Gallatin Pike on the WPLN website. Three years later, we're five pikes long and rolling through an ongoing intermedia experiment that includes poetry broadcasts and performances , regional and local art exhibitions, contributing interactive communities connected through an Instagram account, and a place in Metro Arts' permanent public art collection .

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courtesy MNPS

Metro Schools superintendent Shawn Joseph was asked to defend his decision to cut the reading recovery program during his public budget hearing Wednesday with Mayor David Briley. The literacy initiative costs more than $7 million a year, employing 83 reading specialists to work with small groups of struggling readers.

#16: What Is Love?

Apr 18, 2018
Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Without a doubt, romantic love is a driving force in our culture — with countless movies, songs and books devoted to finding it, losing it or making it last. Falling in (or out of) love can feel so intense in our own lives, but our fundamental assumptions about what love really is are not always correct.

In this episode of Movers & Thinkers, we talk to three guests who have seen a lot of love, heartbreak and romantic confusion: relationship therapist Jeannie Ingram, divorce attorney Siew-Ling Shea, and Alex Pollack, a writer who muses on modern dating culture.

Lauren Bishop / CDC

A nonpartisan analysis finds that the federal government is shouldering a much larger share of individual health insurance costs in Tennessee. Subsidies for those who buy their own insurance on the federal marketplace have increased by 309 percent since 2014, according to the Sycamore Institute. Premiums, by comparison, have risen 185 percent over the same period.

One of the most important — and complex — pieces of Nashville’s mass transit proposal is its funding strategy. There’s been significant focus on proposed increases to four local taxes, which would partly fund the projects. Yet those taxes are only a portion of the plan.

So how, in total, would the transit overhaul be funded? And if the financing projections are off target, how would Metro adjust?

Ron Cogswell / via Flickr

The city of Memphis could lose a quarter-million dollars as punishment for removing statues of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest and Confederate President Jefferson Davis last year.

The Tennessee House of Representatives voted Tuesday to strip the money from next year's state budget. The sum had been earmarked to go toward planning for Memphis' bicentennial celebrations next year.

Alberto G. / via Flickr

Another round of problems with the state's standardized tests has Tennessee lawmakers considering ditching computers and going back to pencils and paper.

The proposal is one of several on the table as leaders grapple with an apparent cyberattack on the TNReady testing system.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Backers of Nashville's $5.4 billion transit plan argue that construction of light rail and expansion of bus service could be good for the city's health. That's because riding typically means much more walking.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

 

People living in a small, rural Tennessee town are still trying to navigate the fallout of a major federal immigration raid earlier this month.

Bean Station, in northeast Tennessee, is home to about 3,000 people. The big jobs in town are the meatpacking plants and tomato fields.

Tennessee Department of Correction

A former prison nurse accused state officials Monday of covering up the circumstances of an inmate's death in 2013, laying out the allegations in testimony before a state legislative panel.

There's an irony at the heart of the treatment of high blood pressure. The malady itself often has no symptoms, yet the medicines to treat it — and to prevent a stroke or heart attack later — can make people feel crummy.

"It's not that you don't want to take it, because you know it's going to help you. But it's the getting used to it," says Sharon Fulson, a customer service representative from Nashville, Tenn., who is trying to monitor and control her hypertension.

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The Promise: Life, Death and Change in the Projects

This WPLN special series podcast explores life in public housing, in the middle of a city on the rise.

The Latest from Classical 91.1

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

Last month, Robert Thompson visited the studio as half of Duo Sudeste. This week, he returned as a director to showcase students from the Belmont University Guitar Ensemble. Ranging from freshman to seniors, the students performed music as duets and quartets in a variety of styles across the guitar repertoire. 

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

Flutist Bart Feller is used to traveling the country with his instrument. While his main gigs are playing principal flute with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and teaching at Rutgers University, he spends summers in the desert playing with the Santa Fe Opera Orchestra and weekends teaching the pre college division at Julliard. 

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

Composer Nicholas Wing gave the world premiere of three works on this week's program, including a piece performed with a violin once played by Bronisław Huberman, founder of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (then known as the Palestine Philharmonic). 

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