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In Clarksville, Police Say They Welcome Body Cameras

Cell phone footage shot by bystanders showing sometimes violent police interactions with civilians has led to more discussions nationwide about whether officers should wear body cameras. In some cities, local law enforcement has resisted that idea. But that’s not the case in Clarksville, where the police department has actually been one of its biggest supporters.

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courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Veterans Affairs hospitals are taking a page from the pharmaceutical playbook — and reversing it. They've hired what are effectively 285 drug company representatives across the country, including one for every VA hospital in Tennessee and Kentucky. But instead of encouraging physicians to prescribe, they're often counseling doctors against giving their patients opioids.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

The Tennessee Department of Education has been ordered to respond soon to a lawsuit filed by Measurement Incorporated that seeks $25.7 million in payment from the state.

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A state audit of the Department of Correction released on Tuesday highlights a number of issues plaguing prisons in Tennessee. The biggest issue is a shortage of correctional officers, which could put inmates and other prison staff at risk.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Williamson County voters will decide early next year whether to raise the local sales tax by half a cent to help fund the school district. The local option rate would go from 2.25 to 2.75 cents if approved.

Blake Farmer / WPLN (File photo)

Tennessee's Health Department is hiring special investigators to keep tabs on the state's compounding pharmacies, which make small-batch, custom drugs. The move is partially in response to the deadly fungal meningitis outbreak of 2012.

Jennifer Clampet / Army Medicine via Flickr

Researchers are turning to Tennessee to find a middle ground on the use of opioids for treating chronic pain. A new study is recruiting 1,000 patients in Tennessee and North Carolina who are taking opioids for chronic pain — a move that comes at a time of conflicting opinions about whether addictive narcotics should even be used to treat long-term pain, unless it's cancer-related.

TN Photo Services

The state of Tennessee is asking for $2 million next year to whip the Memphis Regional Megasite into shape, a process that will include hiring an outside consultant to assess why the decade-long project hasn't yet landed a major manufacturer.

Natasha Senjanovic / WPLN

In Nashville — and across the country — the number of chronically ill people who need round-the-clock care is rising. The vast majority are baby boomers, and most of the people looking after them aren’t much younger. One local nonprofit offers caregivers a break from their duties — at no cost. Yet despite the growing need, the organization says most families in Davidson County don’t know about the service.

David Goehring / via Flickr

TennCare has tightened controls on opioid prescriptions in recent years, and the state's Medicaid program plans to go a step further next year. It's an effort to decrease the use of highly addictive narcotics — and save some money.

California Department of Transportation

Driverless cars may still be a few years away, but Tennessee highway officials say they're already starting to invest in intelligent technologies to help with congestion woes.

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The Latest from Classical 91.1

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Former Tennessee Tech professor Wonkak Kim is back in Middle Tennessee for a visit, so of course we made sure to have him swing through our studios for a performance. Kim, a clarinetist, brought with him the Parker String Quartet. The ensemble is currently on tour and is serving a residency at Harvard.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Mozart wrote his opera, The Marriage of Figaro, in the late 18th century, long before reality television. However, a new production featuring Blair School of Music students highlights the similarities between the over-the-top antics and scheming of the classical-era plot and modern-day shows like Big Brother and The Bachelor. Ahead of their very contemporary production, singers from the Vanderbilt Opera Theater came to sing highlights from the show.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Baritone Jeffrey Williams is a cheerful, friendly guy, but he loves singing roles that explore the darker side of life. The Austin Peay State University professor obtained a Center for Excellence grant for composer Leanna Kirchoff to write a mono-opera based on Guy de Maupassant's "Diary of a Madman," which premiered on a Halloween night recital of spooky and creepy classical music at Austin Peay. Williams is joined by Ben Harris on piano and Kevin Jablonsk playing double-bass, with the composer on hand to tell us about her approach to the piece.

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