Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

After Nashville Visit, Justice Department Asks Police To Consider How It Works With Black Residents

The Department of Justice is recommending that Nashville conduct a thorough study of its policing culture. The direction comes after a white Metro police officer fatally shot a black man earlier this year.

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Metro Nashville Network

Members of the Metro Council say they must “once and for all” find a way to regulate short-term rentals in Nashville. This follows months of arguments and competing ideas for what to do about services like Airbnb, VRBO and HomeAway.

Chas Sisk / WPLN (File photo)

A political scientist at Middle Tennessee State University is predicting next year's race for governor could go down in the books as the state's most expensive race ever.

Kent Syler, an instructor at MTSU and former campaign manager to U.S. Rep. Bart Gordon, says the battle to succeed Gov. Bill Haslam should easily eclipse the $20 million he spent to win the office in 2010 and is likely to surpass the state record $34 million that went into the 2006 Senate campaigns of Bob Corker and Harold Ford, Jr.

U.S. House of Representatives via YouTube

A West Tennessee congressman is urging federal authorities to start requiring seat belts on school buses, rather than waiting for districts and states to take action.

Memphis Democrat Steve Cohen pressed the leaders of the National Transportation Safety Board and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration at a hearing this week to explain why they hadn't acted on its own recommendation that school buses have restraints. Cohen says accidents like last year's fatal rollover crash in Chattanooga show that the need for seat belts is urgent.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Diversity in Nashville continues to be disproportionately low even years after the school district set out guidelines to increase it. Almost one-third of all Metro Nashville students identify as African American, Hispanic or Asian, yet just 16 percent of the teachers that they see everyday look like them, according to a study released by a coalition of nine teacher preparation programs.

The group, called Trailblazer Coalition, is funded by Conexion Americas.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Political leaders and advocates for the health care industry in Tennessee have begun to turn their attention to the future of Obamacare, after Senate Republicans signaled Tuesday that efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act were likely to fail.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The Department of Justice is recommending that Nashville conduct a thorough study of its policing culture. The direction comes after a white Metro police officer fatally shot a black man earlier this year.

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Felons find themselves in a precarious position when they walk out of prison — they often have limited work experience, a criminal background and no time for extensive training. Whether they will return to prison — or not — can come down to one big question: Can they find a job?

Amy Eskind / WPLN

In a city that is growing more racially diverse by the day, Nashville’s police force remains predominantly white. To fix the disparity, the Metro police department has solely focused its outreach efforts in minority communities.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory hope a new federal grant will help them turn plants into fuel. The Department of Energy announced this week that it's providing $12 million next year to the lab in East Tennessee, with the potential for more than $100 million over the next five years. 

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The Latest from Classical 91.1

Ed Lambert / Nashville Public Radio

Jessica Dunnavant, Sheri Hoffman and Yvonne Kendall play trios by Joseph Boismortier and Johann Quantz.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Two weeks ago, we heard performances by faculty teaching music students at the Tennessee Governor's School for the Arts. On this program, we get a taste of the talented high school juniors and seniors who have come from all over the state. 

Per Palmkvist Knudsen / Wikimedia Commons

Yes, you read the headline correctly — since 1989, June has been designated as National Accordion Awareness Month. Chances are, if you’ve ever been around an accordion, it’s difficult to not be aware of it; the instruments (and its many variants) are unique in both physicality and timbre. So why a whole month dedicated to them?

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