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Versify #5: Don’t Try This at Home

6 hours ago

Ambushed by a menacing dog, Nashville  physics teacher (and standup comedian) Bob Clark taps into some unconventional wisdom in his attempt to flee. Bob slyly reveals his story to poet Destiny Birdsong. She’s caught off guard, but weaves the compelling tale into an original poem about physics, relationships, and survival.

 

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is cheering the latest effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, while opponents of the measure are scrambling to derail it before the legislation can pass the U.S. Senate.

Haslam joined 14 other Republican governors Wednesday in signing a letter praising a plan to repeal the ACA's individual mandate, to do away with the requirement that individuals purchase insurance and to convert Medicaid to a system of so-called block grants to the states.

In an appearance in Chattanooga, Haslam called the proposal, known as Graham-Cassidy, a "home run for Tennessee" because the state will receive more money than it currently does for Medicaid.

TN Photo Services (file)

Tennessee has approved another sizeable rate hike for Obamacare insurance plans. But the state's insurance commissioner is also highlighting the failure of a bi-partisan plan to stabilize the federal marketplace.

The president of Nashville State Community College is retiring effective Dec. 31, the middle of the school year. His announcement Wednesday follows a lengthy tenure that was marked by impressive growth as well as flare-ups with some faculty.

Metro Schools classroom
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

New scores meant to show student improvement for the last academic year reveal a wide discrepancy among Nashville-area districts.

Oak Ridge Public Library

Seventy-five years ago this week, the federal government quietly took over 60,000 acres nestled in the ridges of East Tennessee. It was the beginning of Oak Ridge: a city cloaked in secrecy that tens of thousands of people flocked to during World War II, most unknowingly helping to build the world's first atomic bomb.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

The question of whether immigrants brought to the United States as children should qualify for in-state tuition has divided Tennessee Republicans in recent years.

But the five major GOP candidates for governor all see it the same way: They're against it.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

 

A group of community organizers is questioning whether Mayor Megan Barry’s proposed public transit plan could actually hurt communities more than it helps.

 

If a tax referendum is approved next year, the project would kick off with a light rail line on Gallatin Pike in East Nashville. But critics held a small march Tuesday to talk to residents and business owners along the proposed route.

Brian Turner / Flickr

A Tennessee appeals court says a Williamson County judge was wrong to reject a transgender teen's petition to change his legal name.

The judge had apparently determined that the teen and his parents failed to make the case for the name change. But in a ruling released Tuesday, a three-judge panel declared there was plenty of evidence for it.

There's arguably nothing more universal than death — although it's still something most humans don't enjoy thinking about. So at this live taping of Movers & Thinkers, we're facing our fears (and fascination) by talking to three people who come face-to-face with mortality on a daily basis. How does a job like that change the way they think about the end of life? 

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Richard Howard via WBUR

Best Of Car Talk Says Farwell — Share Your Memories

For 30 years, two mechanics with funny accents and infectious laughter have been dispensing pretty good car advice each week Saturday morning on WPLN.

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Movers & Thinkers

What is it like to follow in a parent's footsteps? We discuss in the latest episode. Supported by MTSU's Jones College of Business and the Nashville Software School.

The Latest from Classical 91.1

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Representatives from Music City's classical community will come together this afternoon for the official proclamation of "Classical Music Day" in Nashville. The ceremony begins at 1:00 on the steps of the Schermerhorn Symphony Center and will, of course, include a live performance.  We're kicking off our celebration on the air in the morning, with recordings of Midstate musicians scheduled throughout the day.

As always, you can listen to 91Classical on the radio at 91.1FM, with the Nashville Public Radio app or by streaming audio on this website.

For this week's show, trumpeter Joel Treybig assembled an ensemble to perform a pair of chamber selections from the Baroque era. Treybig is on the faculty at Belmont University School of Music. His colleagues for this performance are oboists Robert Shankle and Grace Woodworth, bassoonist Dong-yun Shankle and harpsichordist Andrew Risinger.

Rebecca Bauer / Gateway Chamber Orchestra

School is in session, we've felt the first hints of autumn's chill in the air — it's the time when new performance seasons traditionally begin. While Middle Tennessee’s professional ensembles and venues don’t all hold to that calendar, now’s still a good time to look at what some of them have in store for the city’s audiences.

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