Nashville Public Radio | NPR News and Classical Music
courtesy Country Music Hall of Fame

Remembering How Mel Tillis Overcame Stuttering To Be A Country Music Star

One of Nashville's most prolific hit-makers died Sunday. Mel Tillis spent the last year dealing with intestinal issues, according to his publicist. He died at a hospital in Ocala, Florida, at age 85.

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Blake Farmer / WPLN

A plan that would end Nashville's long history of running a public hospital is basically an argument that the city doesn't really need one — and that other medical centers in town already dole out far more charity care, especially as General Hospital's caseload has dwindled to 40 patients a day, operating at just a third of its capacity.

Yet those who serve the uninsured say the facility still plays a critical role.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Davidson County's Sheriff says closing Nashville General Hospital's inpatient services could quadruple the amount his agency has to spend on securing inmates while they receive medical care.

Nashville transit
Nashville Mayor's Office

As Nashville Mayor Megan Barry argues in favor of a tax increase to fund mass transit, she’s now taken a shot at critics of her plan. In a talk Monday to the Rotary Club of Nashville, the mayor called out what she considers three myths being pushed by opponents to her plan.

Chris St. Clair / WPLN

Rope lights line the windows of gas stations and minimarkets throughout Nashville— but one Metro Councilwoman wants them taken down, and says they could distract drivers.

A bill to ban the decorations is inching closer to approval.

courtesy Country Music Hall of Fame

One of Nashville's most prolific hit-makers died Sunday. Mel Tillis spent the last year dealing with intestinal issues, according to his publicist. He died at a hospital in Ocala, Florida, at age 85.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Metro General Hospital has decided to defiantly resist closure, which was proposed by Mayor Megan Barry last week. In the meantime, the facility is trying to keep nurses, doctors and administrators from abandoning ship.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Former Tennessee Tech professor Wonkak Kim is back in Middle Tennessee for a visit, so of course we made sure to have him swing through our studios for a performance. Kim, a clarinetist, brought with him the Parker String Quartet. The ensemble is currently on tour and is serving a residency at Harvard.

courtesy TBI via Twitter

The state of Tennessee has been voted the best in the nation this year for its laws intended to prevent child sex trafficking. That’s according to Shared Hope International, which since 2011 has been grading states in part on their laws combating child sex traffickers.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Cell phone footage shot by bystanders showing sometimes violent police interactions with civilians has led to more discussions nationwide about whether officers should wear body cameras. In some cities, local law enforcement has resisted that idea.

But that’s not the case in Clarksville, where the police department has actually been one of its biggest supporters.

In bright yellow polo shirts, and often gliding through crowds on motorized Segways, the downtown Nashville “ambassadors” are easy to spot. And they’re seemingly omnipresent — working 16 hours a day, every day.

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Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Former Tennessee Tech professor Wonkak Kim is back in Middle Tennessee for a visit, so of course we made sure to have him swing through our studios for a performance. Kim, a clarinetist, brought with him the Parker String Quartet. The ensemble is currently on tour and is serving a residency at Harvard.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Mozart wrote his opera, The Marriage of Figaro, in the late 18th century, long before reality television. However, a new production featuring Blair School of Music students highlights the similarities between the over-the-top antics and scheming of the classical-era plot and modern-day shows like Big Brother and The Bachelor. Ahead of their very contemporary production, singers from the Vanderbilt Opera Theater came to sing highlights from the show.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Baritone Jeffrey Williams is a cheerful, friendly guy, but he loves singing roles that explore the darker side of life. The Austin Peay State University professor obtained a Center for Excellence grant for composer Leanna Kirchoff to write a mono-opera based on Guy de Maupassant's "Diary of a Madman," which premiered on a Halloween night recital of spooky and creepy classical music at Austin Peay. Williams is joined by Ben Harris on piano and Kevin Jablonsk playing double-bass, with the composer on hand to tell us about her approach to the piece.

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