Meribah Knight / WPLN

'Diffusers' Try To Cure Violence In This Nashville Neighborhood

Rodney Northington is an unlikely person to be telling folks who live in the James Cayce housing projects to put down their guns. He’s a convicted felon, a former drug dealer and at one-time a high-ranking gang member. But he’s also, quite possibly, the perfect man for the job.

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Scott DesJarlais via Twitter

Tennessee’s lone GOP holdout who maintained he was leaning against voting for the health care bill Friday, says it’s time to work harder to get it right. Congressman Scott DesJarlais, whose district includes Murfreesboro, disliked the Republicans’ bill because he said it didn’t solve enough of the problems of Obamacare.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

This year's state legislative session has been dominated by headline-grabbing debates over issues like transgender bathrooms and six-week abortion bans.

But it’s often not the proposals that gain the most attention that actually become Tennessee law. Sometimes it’s the less ambitious measures that hide in their wake.

WPLN statehouse reporter Chas Sisk is here to talk more about that, with some of the legislative wins and losses from the last week.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

Rodney Northington is an unlikely person to be telling folks who live in the James Cayce housing projects to put down their guns. He’s a convicted felon, a former drug dealer and at one-time a high-ranking gang member. But he’s also, quite possibly, the perfect man for the job.

Tennessee Tech University

Six public universities who had been part of the Tennessee Board of Regents are holding their first independent board meetings over the next few weeks.

It marks a major change in the way decisions at the schools are made. When the president of Tennessee Tech University, Philip Oldham, opened its inaugural board meeting on Thursday, he called it "truly a historic occasion."

courtesy Fisk University

Kevin Rome will step into the position of Fisk University’s 16th leader on July 1. He is currently president of Lincoln University in Missouri, which like Fisk, is a historically black institution.

In a statement, Rome said those who have held the position before him have left a strong legacy of leadership, upon which he’s ready to build.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Nashville's local ordinance that lightened the penalties for marijuana possession are close to being overturned.

Tennessee lawmakers say it's potentially discriminatory.

Blake Farmer / WPLN (File photo)

Updated Friday at 8:00 a.m.:

Rep. David Kustoff of West Tennessee released a statement early Friday signaling his support after reserving judgment on Thursday, saying he wanted to see the final draft.

"Republicans have promised to repeal this disastrous law and provide relief to the American people. Later today, I will vote to do just that."

Reported Earlier:

Rep. Scott DesJarlais got an audience with the president on Thursday as part of the House Freedom Caucus. Within the GOP, the group has voiced some of the loudest opposition to the healthcare plan that could replace Obamacare.

Opportunity Now Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

One of Nashville Mayor Megan Barry’s ambitious goals has been to find summer jobs for 10,000 teens and young adults. She’s been recruiting employers to offer positions, and now her administration is trying to find youth to fill them.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

An actor portraying an early Frederick Douglass (pre-white hair) performed at an East Nashville park that — after Wednesday — more clearly honors the abolitionist and former slave.

MyDoorSign.com / Flickr

Tennessee lawmakers have rejected a measure that would've restricted which bathroom transgender students can use, apparently putting an end to the debate for the year.

A Senate panel on Wednesday declined to take up a proposal that would have required transgender students to use the bathroom of the sex on their birth certificate.

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Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump's Tweets, Annotated

President Trump tweets a lot. With tens of millions of followers on Twitter, Trump proposes policy, shares his latest actions and reacts to the news. But 140 characters rarely gives the full context. Here, NPR fact checkers attempt to do just that for key tweets.

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The Latest from Classical 91.1

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

This week, we get a preview of two upcoming student recitals at Lipscomb University. Christian Johnson grew up in Dickson; Jeriel Jorguenson is from Belize but now  lives in Nashville. Both have studied with Jerome Reed since they were students in high school. Now, the pair are finishing their last year of college.

Anita Martinz / Wikimedia Commons

Today marks the vernal equinox, and for the Northern Hemisphere, the first day of spring. With the turn of the season comes warmer weather (at least, in theory), the first buds on the trees and blooms on the ground, afternoon thunderstorms and choruses of chirping birds.

If you're smitten with this season, you aren't alone: tons of composers throughout history have been inspired by spring to write some unforgettable music. 

Jim McGuire / edgarmeyer.com

In 1986, Edgar Meyer made his first solo appearance with the Nashville Symphony, performing Bottesini’s Double Bass Concerto No. 2. Now, 30 years later, Meyer will play the piece with the orchestra again. This time, however, the accompanying program will include the world premiere of a new piece composed by Meyer himself.

This isn't the first time the Nashville Symphony has premiered a new work by Meyer, but it does signal a new approach to writing music for the award-winning composer and instrumentalist. 

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Indivisible

Indivisible: A Special Call-In Show During President Trump's First 100 Days

Listen and be part of the conversation: Monday - Thursday at 7 p.m. on 90.3 WPLN-FM