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Jay Shah / WPLN

Why Vanderbilt Believes A ‘Smart’ Prosthetic Could Make Life Easier For People With Amputations

Imagine walking flat-footed everywhere you went, that's what traditional prosthetics can often feel like. But engineers at Vanderbilt University say they've found a solution for amputees that complain about soreness and pain when walking on slopes or climbing stairs.

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Blake Farmer / WPLN

Nashville's in-school clinics for teachers and their families are successfully reducing health care costs. According to a new study led by the nonprofit RAND Corporation, primary care delivered within Metro Schools saves more than $700 a year for every teacher who uses it.

Jay Shah / WPLN

Imagine walking flat-footed everywhere you went, that's what traditional prosthetics can often feel like.

But engineers at Vanderbilt University say they've found a solution for amputees that complain about soreness and pain when walking on slopes or climbing stairs.

Nashville skyline
WPLN / File

Nashville will soon add more scrutiny over the spending of the city government — and this time leaders in the private sector will be asked for advice.

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

This week in Studio C, the spotlight was on students who are wrapping up nearly a month of intense study at the Tennessee Governor's School for the Arts. Of the 331 teenagers at the school this year, 166 are studying music. A handful of those students stopped by to give performances of the repertoire they've been working on. 

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Health workers in Nashville have turned their focus to homeless people amid a growing outbreak of hepatitis A and some of the first diagnosed cases among people living on the streets. They're finding it takes some convincing to get many to agree to a vaccination.

Manuel Cuevas with Johnny Cash
Photo courtesy of Morelia Cuevas via StoryCorps

Nashville tailor Manuel Cuevas, the maker of rhinestone-studded suits worn by entertainers like Elvis Presley and Jack White, is receiving one of the nation's highest honors for folk artists.

The National Endowment for the Arts announced this week that he has won its National Heritage Fellowship, one of only 10 people who'll receive the honor this year.

Metro Council Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The slimmed-down Nashville city budget is locked in for next year, but council members are already warning about more severe cuts in the years to come. Some see a growing gap between all that the city needs to pay for, and having enough money to do so.

Hunter Armistead

For singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier, coming to country music in her 40s was one of many things that made her feel like an industry outsider. Today, Mary speaks with poet Destiny Birdsong about her unconventional entry into the music business, and how an unforgettable performance at the Ryman redefined Mary’s relationship to her music — and to herself. Destiny takes the high notes of their conversation and composes an original poem.

David Briley metro Council
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

One of the clear losers in Nashville’s new government budget is the Metro Finance Department. A last-minute change will cut its budget by $103,000, likely eliminating at least one staff member.

While the dollar amount isn’t large, the reduction reveals how frustrated the Metro Council has become with some of the spending ideas among the city’s top finance officials.

Jay Shah / WPLN

Nashville Airport Authority is trying to keep up with the flood of tourists and business travellers that have made Nashville International one of the fastest growing airports in the country.

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The Promise: Life, Death and Change in the Projects

This WPLN special series podcast explores life in public housing, in the middle of a city on the rise.

The Latest from Classical 91.1

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

This week in Studio C, the spotlight was on students who are wrapping up nearly a month of intense study at the Tennessee Governor's School for the Arts. Of the 331 teenagers at the school this year, 166 are studying music. A handful of those students stopped by to give performances of the repertoire they've been working on. 

Becky Cohen / Courtesy of The Pauline Oliveros Trust

Queer composers have been creating music throughout history. Archaic Greek poet Sappho, for instance, was penning homoerotic song lyrics on the island of Lesbos as early as the 7th century BC. In many cases, though, the politics of culture and time may have prevented them from being completely open about their identities—and musicologists have for years pondered and debated over the sexual orientation of some of classical music history’s biggest names.

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

Each summer since 1985, talented students from all over Tennessee have gathered in Murfreesboro for a month-long residency arts program, mentored by some of the best faculty members from the state and beyond. And each summer, we look forward to welcoming musicians from the Tennessee Governor's School of the Arts to Live in Studio C. This week features music from the school's faculty; next week, we'll hear from their students. 

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