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TN Secretary of State's office

After more than a decade of planning, the state of Tennessee has started construction on a new Library & Archives building, as officials formally broke ground Monday at the corner of Sixth Avenue North and Jefferson Street.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

The largest employers in Nashville have agreed to promote voter registration as part of their hiring process. The project is spearheaded by Democratic Congressman Jim Cooper and Republican state Sen. Steve Dickerson, who last year promoted registration in Nashville high schools and saw an 85 percent bump.

homeless shelter Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

When temperatures drop this winter, Nashville will add another way of sheltering the homeless. Room In The Inn, which typically coordinates a network of temporary shelters, will start opening its own doors overnight, and there will be fewer rules about who can come inside.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

As a palliative care doctor at Alive Hospice, Sasha Bowers has been there at the very end of life for a lot of people. This exposure to the dying has given her a perspective on death that most people don't have, and she talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our podcast Movers & Thinkers about what she's learned.


Blake Farmer / WPLN

Nashville General Hospital is trying to keep a negative audit from being used to justify shutting down the facility. The Metro Hospital Authority has been fighting a proposal from Mayor Megan Barry to downsize the city's struggling safety-net hospital, and some board members are worried about how an audit might look to the casual observer.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Every weekday morning, public radio listeners across Middle Tennessee tune in to the dulcet voice of WPLN morning host Jason Moon Wilkins. Presumably, when they hear him, most listeners are interested in the news he's sharing and the local stories he's playing. But eventually, one anonymous listener started wondering about Jason Moon Wilkins himself, submitting this Curious Nashville question:

If Jason Moon Wilkins was in a line arranged alphabetically by last name for the rope climb in gym class, is he in the middle or at the end?

Kristi Jones / Lipscomb University

When Fred Gray was a high schooler in Nashville, he dreamed of going to Lipscomb University — which he could not, due to segregation. After becoming a lawyer he tried suing the school, and lost. Today, Gray helps raise money and teaches at an institute on campus that bears his name. And Lipscomb is creating the first public archives of his papers.

Flickr

Home prices in Nashville may be leveling out in 2018. A forecast by Realtor.com says that's because the number of homes for sale in the area is increasing.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Davidson County is marking a steep drop in infant sleep deaths. The number of infants who suffocated while sleeping dropped 29 percent in one year. So called "sleep-related deaths" dipped to 15 in 2016, representing one in five of all infant deaths.

Bredesen for Senate

Former Gov. Phil Bredesen has officially entered the race for the U.S. Senate, a move that could have ramifications both for Tennessee politics and Democrats' chances nationwide of retaking Congress.

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The Latest from Classical 91.1

Director Jason Shelton brought Portara Ensemble back to Studio C in advance of the choir's concert on winter and holiday themes, drawing from classical and American folk traditions. The full performance is at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, December 10 at Belle Meade United Methodist Church. 

Image courtesy Robbie Lynn Hunsinger

"Gorgeous," "stunning" and “so wrong.” These are the words that artist Robbie Lynn Hunsinger uses to describe her experience of the total solar eclipse this past August. She says she watched the awe-inspiring and eerie event from one of the best spots in town: a hillside next to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Timbre Cierpke grew up in Nashville in a very musical family (her name is a musical term, even) and she's carrying on the family tradition as a very active harpist and vocalist. 

Each year she organizes a Christmas concert with her band and the acapella choir Sonus; this year that performance is at 7:00 pm Friday, December 8 at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Brentwood. For her performance in Studio C, Cieprke brought her own arrangements of holiday music to perform with cellist Lindsey Smith-Trostie.

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We take you into the minds of some of Nashville's most interesting innovators as they discuss everything from art to business, food to technology, and much in between.