Chas Sisk / WPLN

By Shaving 2 Years Off A Medical Degree, MTSU And Meharry Aim For Students Who ‘Could Go Anywhere’

Meharry Medical College and Middle Tennessee State University have come up with a plan that they believe could help close the healthcare gap between Tennessee's cities and its rural areas.

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Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

This week, a versatile young harpist from Wales stopped by Studio C on his way between a festival in New Orleans and a workshop in Louisville. At just 21, it would be impressive enough if Ben Creighton Griffiths only held the principal harp position for one professional orchestra, but he's got that job with two ensembles, plus parallel careers as a touring soloist in both the classical and jazz genres. Griffiths gave us a taste of the wide range of music he can tease out of a single instrument, from impressionistic classical and traditional Welsh to walking bass and modal jazz.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

The dilemma of choosing between commercial success and artistic independence is a familiar one for many musicians in Nashville, including Vanessa Carlton. After releasing hits like “A Thousand Miles,” she says she felt stifled by her major labels and decided to go independent, a shift that also changed the way she saw herself.

Carlton talked to WPLN’s Emily Siner in the live taping of our podcast Movers & Thinkers about starting over on her own.


Susan Urmy / courtesy VUMC via Flickr

Congressman Jim Cooper says he's worried about the safety of immigrants deported back to Iraq and wants officials from that country to intervene to ensure they won't be harmed by extremists.

Wikimedia Commons

As composers in the mid-20th century began wild experiments in sound, the practice of traditional music notation became increasingly inadequate. How, for example, could the sound of John Cage’s amplified cactus, or the electroacoustic experiments of Pierre Schaeffer be effectively scored by notes on a staff?

As a result, the art of graphic notation — the use of shapes or patterns instead of, or together with, conventional notation — began. The scores generally fall in one of two categories: Some strive to communicate specific compositional intentions, while others are meant to inspire the performer’s imagination.

Here’s a look at a few graphic scores, the ways they’ve been interpreted by performers and how the tradition has evolved over the years.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Meharry Medical College and Middle Tennessee State University have come up with a plan that they believe could help close the healthcare gap between Tennessee's cities and its rural areas.

TN Photo Services (file)

Professors at Tennessee Tech University say they're seeing some downsides in their freedom from the Board of Regents. Six universities broke away from the state system in the last year. Now, they're finalizing their first budgets.

COURTESY MNPD

The state’s top law enforcement agency promised a complete and thorough investigation into the fatal shooting of a Nashville man by a city police officer. But a WPLN examination of a 600-page case file casts doubt on the thoroughness of the probe, and it reveals discrepancies between how the case was investigated and how officials have been describing their work for months.

TN Photo Services (File photo)

A Nashville proposal to limit cooperation with federal immigration authorities is drawing strong condemnation from some top Middle Tennessee Republicans.

The sponsor of a 2009 state law banning so-called "sanctuary cities" says he's prepared to have the Metro Council proposal struck down if it wins final approval at a meeting next month.

The proposal passed a second of three votes Tuesday night, over the objections of some council members who asked for more time.

courtesy LEAD Academy

One of the pioneering charter school networks in Nashville has lost a bit of confidence from district administrators. The Metro Schools central office is recommending denial of two separate applications for new schools from LEAD. 

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Charlie Morris vividly recalls his brother's murder.

Jesse Lee Bond was a sharecropper in Shelby County. Suspicious because his harvests never seemed to cover his debts, in the spring of 1939, Bond asked the local general store for a receipt of his seed purchases.

For his diligence, he was shot, castrated, dragged and left for dead in the Hatchie River.

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The Latest from Classical 91.1

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

This week, a versatile young harpist from Wales stopped by Studio C on his way between a festival in New Orleans and a workshop in Louisville. At just 21, it would be impressive enough if Ben Creighton Griffiths only held the principal harp position for one professional orchestra, but he's got that job with two ensembles, plus parallel careers as a touring soloist in both the classical and jazz genres. Griffiths gave us a taste of the wide range of music he can tease out of a single instrument, from impressionistic classical and traditional Welsh to walking bass and modal jazz.

Wikimedia Commons

As composers in the mid-20th century began wild experiments in sound, the practice of traditional music notation became increasingly inadequate. How, for example, could the sound of John Cage’s amplified cactus, or the electroacoustic experiments of Pierre Schaeffer be effectively scored by notes on a staff?

As a result, the art of graphic notation — the use of shapes or patterns instead of, or together with, conventional notation — began. The scores generally fall in one of two categories: Some strive to communicate specific compositional intentions, while others are meant to inspire the performer’s imagination.

Here’s a look at a few graphic scores, the ways they’ve been interpreted by performers and how the tradition has evolved over the years.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Each summer, talented high school students from around the state gather in Murfreesboro to hone their visual art, theater, dance or music skills with college-level teachers at the Governor's School for the Arts. We got a taste of how much fun the faculty get to have, as professors from the music division performed lively selections together with their peers.

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Movers & Thinkers

What is it really like to reinvent yourself in your career and life? We discuss in the latest episode.