USDA / Flickr

Tennessee County Fights 'Food Insecurity' Of Students By Feeding Whole Families

Starting tonight, kids in a rural West Tennessee county who rely on feeding services over the summer will take home a week's worth of single-serve breakfasts and lunches and food for the whole family on weekends. It’s part of a pilot project funded by food giant ConAgra.
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One state agency is now training police officers in Tennessee on how to better interact with people who have disabilities. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities created the training guide as part of a settlement over a decades-long lawsuit.

BACH via Facebook

Nashville’s historically black medical school is returning students to Fort Campbell’s hospital for regular clinical rotations. A formal signing ceremony with Meharry Medical College takes place Friday.

Meharry students get hand-on experience primarily at Metro General Hospital, but also other health centers around Middle Tennessee. The school’s vice dean over clinical affiliations, Frank Royal, says Fort Campbell isn’t exactly new to the list.

“In the past, we have had a relationship with Fort Campbell, and we are rekindling that relationship.”

USDA / Flickr

Starting tonight, kids in a rural West Tennessee county who rely on feeding services over the summer will take home a week's worth of single-serve breakfasts and lunches and food for the whole family on weekends. It’s part of a pilot project funded by food giant ConAgra.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

An expansion of Volkswagen’s plant in Chattanooga, which is under construction now, could create nearly 10,000 permanent jobs. That’s the finding of an economic impact study commissioned by the German automaker and completed by University of Tennessee professor Bill Fox.

He says there will be thousands of short-term jobs during the construction phase and then 2,000 new jobs inside the plant assembling a new SUV and staffing a new engineering center.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Children began gathering in the parking lot of Murfreesboro's Spring Valley apartments before 9 a.m. Just as scheduled, a blue and green custom painted bus rolled around the corner at 9:15.

“Chow bus! Chow bus! Chow bus!” three-year-old Gunner Fischer chanted.

Liana Aghajanian / Flickr

The number of pets put down in Nashville has dropped by nearly a third in the past five years. The kill rate is now below 50 percent, down from more than 80 percent.

Denise Krebs via Flickr

Some schools in Nashville will be offering a new foreign language next fall: Arabic. The idea is to teach students a relevant world language, as well as to engage those who already speak Arabic at home.

Mike DuBose / UMC

The United Methodist Church's Nashville-based communications arm is spending millions on a new round of TV advertising in an effort to battle religious stereotypes and appeal to younger members.

WPLN

Nashville’s population grew more than any other city in Tennessee last year, according to new Census estimates. But in terms of percentages, the fastest growing areas in Tennessee lie outside of Nashville.

Murfreesboro added nearly 4,000 people. That’s a 3.4 percent uptick in one year. Clarksville popped up by 2.8 percent. Cal Wray of the local chamber of commerce says the population increase is evident now that traffic is becoming a problem.

Wikimedia Commons/Ken Thomas

The big warehouse of SPEAKeasy Spirits distillery in West Nashville is lined with dozens of barrels. In a few years, there might be thousands of them. 

“We’re going to start construction on a big barrelhouse because we’re running out of room,” says Jenny Pennington, one of the the company's founders.

SPEAKeasy is among an influx of new distilleries in Tennessee, many of which want to make the state’s signature liquor — whiskey. But there’s a problem: They can’t just open up shop and start selling it. They have to let it sit in a barrel and age. 

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