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Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Tennessee's Next Governor: Only One Republican Would Allow Sports Betting

Only one Republican running to be Tennessee's next governor is open to the idea of allowing sports betting. The question came up during a GOP debate in Hendersonville on Wednesday night. A recent federal court ruling paves the way for states to legalize gambling on college and professional games.

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Hunter Armistead

For singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier, coming to country music in her 40s was one of many things that made her feel like an industry outsider. Today, Mary speaks with poet Destiny Birdsong about her unconventional entry into the music business, and how an unforgettable performance at the Ryman redefined Mary’s relationship to her music — and to herself. Destiny takes the high notes of their conversation and composes an original poem.

David Briley metro Council
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

One of the clear losers in Nashville’s new government budget is the Metro Finance Department. A last-minute change will cut its budget by $103,000, likely eliminating at least one staff member.

While the dollar amount isn’t large, the reduction reveals how frustrated the Metro Council has become with some of the spending ideas among the city’s top finance officials.

Jay Shah / WPLN

Nashville Airport Authority is trying to keep up with the flood of tourists and business travellers that have made Nashville International one of the fastest growing airports in the country.

Becky Cohen / Courtesy of The Pauline Oliveros Trust

Queer composers have been creating music throughout history. Archaic Greek poet Sappho, for instance, was penning homoerotic song lyrics on the island of Lesbos as early as the 7th century BC. In many cases, though, the politics of culture and time may have prevented them from being completely open about their identities—and musicologists have for years pondered and debated over the sexual orientation of some of classical music history’s biggest names.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Only one Republican running to be Tennessee's next governor is open to the idea of allowing sports betting.

The question came up during a GOP debate in Hendersonville on Wednesday night. A recent federal court ruling paves the way for states to legalize gambling on college and professional games.

computer keyboard
Zulfikar Dharmawan / via Flickr

It wasn't a cyberattack that took down TNReady exams earlier this year but an error by the testing company. External investigators and the state comptroller made the conclusion after reviewing the crash that disrupted standardized tests statewide.

City Hall Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Nashville will not be raising its property tax. That was the outcome of a tense 4-hour Metro Council debate that ended after midnight early Wednesday — and only after a shocking vote that drew audible gasps from the council.

Jay Shah / WPLN

The city of Nashville recognized Juneteenth, the oldest known U.S. holiday marking the end of slavery, with an inaugural event Tuesday that organizers hope will launch an annual celebration.

courtesy Barbershop Harmony Society

The Barbershop Harmony Society is inviting women to be full members of the organization for the first time, effective immediately. The Nashville-based umbrella group says the decision is part of a "new strategic vision" meant to be more inclusive and welcome people of all races, sexual orientations, political opinions and spiritual beliefs.

Metro Council meeting
WPLN / File

The question of a possible property tax increase for Nashville households remains unanswered after a marathon budget debate of more than 4 hours on Monday.

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The Promise: Life, Death and Change in the Projects

This WPLN special series podcast explores life in public housing, in the middle of a city on the rise.

The Latest from Classical 91.1

Becky Cohen / Courtesy of The Pauline Oliveros Trust

Queer composers have been creating music throughout history. Archaic Greek poet Sappho, for instance, was penning homoerotic song lyrics on the island of Lesbos as early as the 7th century BC. In many cases, though, the politics of culture and time may have prevented them from being completely open about their identities—and musicologists have for years pondered and debated over the sexual orientation of some of classical music history’s biggest names.

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

Each summer since 1985, talented students from all over Tennessee have gathered in Murfreesboro for a month-long residency arts program, mentored by some of the best faculty members from the state and beyond. And each summer, we look forward to welcoming musicians from the Tennessee Governor's School of the Arts to Live in Studio C. This week features music from the school's faculty; next week, we'll hear from their students. 

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

While the Nashville Symphony is just wrapping up the second year of its Accelerando program, they are already looking forward to its long-term results. Meant to foster the talent of young musicians from underrepresented ethnicities, the initiative works to prepare students for careers in the classical field with private lessons from Nashville Symphony players, among other perks.

Walter Bitner, the Symphony's Director of Education and Community Engagement, hopes that in the decades to come, Accelerando will help orchestras "begin to look more like their communities." Representing Accelerando for Live in Studio C was 16-year-old violist Emily Martinez-Perez and 17-year-old flutist Aalia Hanif, and audiences can hear a concert from all of the Accelerando students at the Schermerhorn on June 11

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