Blake Farmer / WPLN

30th Infantry Vets Trade WW II Tales, One Last Time

Allied forces declared victory in Europe 70 years ago this week. Many of those World War II veterans who returned home started gathering for annual reunions just a few years later. But that tradition is coming to an end. The strapping soldiers from units like the 30th Infantry Division are now too sick or unsteady to travel.
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TN Photo Services

Gov. Bill Haslam is standing by a decision to limit tax relief to veterans.

The governor says he supports a bill passed by the Tennessee legislature to rein in the rapid growth of a state program that helps veterans pay their local property tax bills.

TVA

A former environmental chief under President George W. Bush toured Watts Bar Unit II in Spring City, Tenn., last week. She used the visit to remind the Tennessee Valley Authority and its ratepayers about the benefits of nuclear power.

World Coalition Against the Death Penalty via Flickr

This week, Tennessee's Supreme Court will tackle yet another question related to the death penalty.

Can death row inmates sue to avoid the electric chair?

Justices will meet in Knoxville on Wednesday to consider one of the latest spinoffs to the national debate over executions.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Nearly 7,500 Tennessee adults have applied for free technical college under a program called Tennessee Reconnect. This means Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology are expecting more students than ever before.

TCAT Nashville, for example, currently has 1,000 students enrolled, says director Mark Lenz. The number who have applied there for the fall through Tennessee Reconnect is more than 1,600, according to the governor's office.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Allied forces declared victory in Europe 70 years ago this week. Many of those World War II veterans who returned home started gathering for annual reunions just a few years later. But that tradition is coming to an end. The strapping soldiers from units like the 30th Infantry Division are now too sick or unsteady to travel.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

Tennesseans will soon be able to get alcohol with their takeout.

Gov. Bill Haslam has signed a measure, House Bill 1011, that will let delivery services bring along up to a gallon of alcohol per customer. Deliverers must first get a state license, and they'll have to ask for ID.

They're allowed to start providing the service July 1.

James Case via Flickr

Gun owners in Tennessee can now apply to carry for life.

Gov. Bill Haslam has signed House Bill 745, which lets Tennesseans request permits that never expire. They'll cost $500.

Law enforcement will still run criminal background checks on lifetime permit holders once every five years. Those who have lost their right to carry will have up to 30 days to turn over their permits or face suspension of their drivers' licenses.

Tasha A F Lemley

Editor's Note: This is only one of many stories of the disastrous flood that hit Nashville five years ago this week. But when we hear what happened to Jeff Jones, his family and the staff of his Woodbine restaurant, a more universal experience of the flood resonates.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

"Ban The Box" — a national campaign to convince employers to drop questions about applicants' criminal history — has launched a petition to strike the requirement from Metro Nashville job forms.

Organizers say they need 7,000 signatures to get the matter on Metro's August ballot. If they succeed, they say countless former inmates could find it easier to resettle into society, giving them more stability and reducing the chances that they'll offend again.

Stephen Jerkins

In Mayor Karl Dean’s final State of Metro address, he said "I don't apologize" for focusing on downtown redevelopment. The mayor framed his signature project—and the most expensive in city history—as an economic stimulus.

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Tuesday May 5th

We are pleased to participate in the second annual Big Payback, 24 hours of giving to Middle Tennessee non-profits. It starts at 12am on May 5th!