Chas Sisk / WPLN

For Some Nashville Voters, The First Presidential Debate Merited A Watch Party

For hardcore fans of politics, Monday night's debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was can't miss TV. And for many of those people in Nashville, that meant a watch party.
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Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Last year, flutist Deanna Little brought a group of musicians from Middle Tennessee State University to Studio C to perform selections from The Dolly Project, chamber music by area composers inspired by Dolly Parton, specifically her song "Coat of Many Colors." It tells a story from Parton's youth and a children's book she wrote. Since then, Little has continued her university-funded work towards the goal of putting together an album of classical music written by Tennesseans, performed by Tennesseans, about a Tennessean.

Today, Little returned with more music from the project, using every variety of flute in the instrument's family (that's a contrabass flute in the foreground of the photo). She even recruited host Will Griffin to participate in the performance.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Corrections Corporation of America says it's laying off 12 percent of the workforce in its Nashville headquarters — an announcement that comes as scrutiny of private prison operators is mounting.

Jean Shepard, one of the first women to find success in country music as a solo act, died Sunday at age 82. Shepard was a feisty, straight-shooting singer who created a career in an industry where she had few female role models.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

State educators are slimming down what they're teaching Tennessee schoolchildren about the Muslim world, following complaints the old lessons were too friendly toward Islam.

The State Board of Education has released draft revisions to Tennessee's social studies standards for kindergarten through high school. Critics said the previous standards, especially those used in middle school world history classes, were "indoctrinating" students by focusing too much on Muslim beliefs.

The state suggests reducing the middle school content on the Islamic world during the Middle Ages from 10 standards to five.

U.S. Department of Education via Flickr

Nashville pre-K classrooms have become laboratories in the effort to improve discipline for the youngest students. And there are signs that a more positive approach could cut down the surprisingly high number of preschool suspensions.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

For hardcore fans of politics, Monday night's debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was can't miss TV.

And for many of those people in Nashville, that meant a watch party.

NPR Live Fact-Checks The First Debate

21 hours ago
Meg Kelly / NPR

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton went head-to-head Monday night in the first presidential debate.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, live annotated the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are underlined in yellow, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

You can also follow highlights of the debate in NPR's updating news story at npr.org.

Emily Siner / WPLN

The state's largest health insurance carrier, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, will no longer offer coverage for about 130,000 customers in the state's urban areas.

This decision affects people who buy their own coverage, either on the federal Marketplace or independently, in the regions around Nashville, Knoxville or Memphis. It will not affect people who buy insurance through their employer, the company says.

Jeff Kubina / via Flickr

Chris Hulin, who is president of the Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia, just had a golden opportunity to play the patient.

"I recently had surgery on my left foot," he says, apologizing for wearing Birkenstocks around MTSA's Madison campus.

Emily Siner / WPLN / Infogram

Enrollment has decreased in many of Tennessee's public institutions this fall, even as the state is pushing to increase the number of people with college degrees. College administrators say they're working against something that tends to bring those numbers down: a good economy.

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Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me! Live at TPAC on November 3

NPR’s Peabody Award-winning quiz show will be recorded live before a studio audience, and you can be there.

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Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Last year, flutist Deanna Little brought a group of musicians from Middle Tennessee State University to Studio C to perform selections from The Dolly Project, chamber music by area composers inspired by Dolly Parton, specifically her song "Coat of Many Colors." It tells a story from Parton's youth and a children's book she wrote. Since then, Little has continued her university-funded work towards the goal of putting together an album of classical music written by Tennesseans, performed by Tennesseans, about a Tennessean.

Today, Little returned with more music from the project, using every variety of flute in the instrument's family (that's a contrabass flute in the foreground of the photo). She even recruited host Will Griffin to participate in the performance.

Wharton Photography / Nashville Symphony

This weekend, the Nashville Symphony celebrates 70 years of existence and a decade in its concert hall. It’s also using the fist concert of this year’s classical series to honor that building’s namesake: Kenneth Schermerhorn.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

The Gateway Chamber Orchestra draws on Austin Peay State University's music faculty as well as symphony and session players from around the region. This season, along with playing works of the great masters, the ensemble is celebrating the diversity of music found in our area. For the opening concert, they've invited Stephen Seifert to play a concerto for mountain dulcimer written by a Middle Tennessee resident.

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